DENIZLI


Nestled against high mountains near the Buyuk Menderes (Meander) River is Denizli. Surrounded by the natural beauty of a verdant valley, the area is also rich in culture and history. The Luvians were the first inhabitants, followed centuries later by the Hittites. Over the centuries the fertile plain nourished other civilizations: the Phrygians, Lydians, Persians, Macedonians, Romans, Byzantines, Seljuks, and the Ottomans. Modern Denizli is a city of wide streets, parks and hotels. The Ataturk Ethnographical Museum in the city center displays folk art and ethnic artifacts. While shopping in the Kaleici Carsisi look for souvenirs of copper, jewelery, towels and silk blouses. You can choose among Camlik, Incilipinar or Gokpinar Parks for a rest, picnic, or simply a walk through the forest in the shade of pine trees. The fresh water springs and thermal baths attract many visitors.

A magical and spectacular natural site, unique in the world, Pamukkale (Hierapolis) is a fairyland of dazzling white, petrified castles. Thermal spring waters laden with calcareous salts running off the plateau's edge have created this fantastic formation of stalactites, cataracts and basins. The hot springs have been used since Roman times for their therapeutic powers. Both the thermal center with its motels and thermal pools, and the ruins of the ancient city of Hierapolis, are situated on the plateau.

Another thermal center northwest of Pamukkale, Karahayit is known for its water's high-iron content.



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